Moon Craters

Good morning scientists! We had a great time simulating meteoroids crashing into the moon causing craters to form. Try it with your little scientist today, you will be glad you did! 🙂

MaterialsMoon Craters (4)

Round Cake Pan

Flour

Marbles (Various sizes)

Investigation

  1. Fill a round cake pan with flour so that the entire bottom is covered by 1-2 inches of flour.Moon Craters (6)
  2. Gently shake the pan to level out your flour.Moon Craters (10)
  3. Hold your hand out above the flour and drop down your marble(s). It is fun to try one marble at a time, and multiple marbles hitting at once.Moon Craters (25)
  4. Remove the marble(s) from the flour gently to reveal your crater(s). Repeat forming as many craters as you desire.Moon Craters (21)

Talking Points

Above are two pictures taken from our telescope of the moon. Our moon as been hit by thousands of meteoroids over the years causing it to be pocketed by craters. Craters on the moon are bowl shaped holes that are created by a meteoroid hitting the surface of the moon. You can see the craters in the pictures from our telescope. A meteoroid is a small body (object, usually rock) traveling through our solar system that would be called a meteor if it passed through the Earth’s atmosphere.

In our experiment, the surface of the moon was represented by flour. Our marble represented the meteoroid hitting the moon.

The moon is hit by isolated meteoroids and can be hit by several meteoroids at once as part of a meteoroid storm. On the real moon, when a meteoroid hits the surface of the moon it explodes and dissipates causing a crater to be formed. Our marbles didn’t disappear when they hit our flour, but when we removed the marble it left an indentation just like a real meteoroid does.

Extended Learning: Have even more fun learning about the moon by making our

DIY Moon Sand (22)
2 Ingredient DIY Moon Sand
Moon Phase Cups (36)
Moon Phase Cups

 

Oreo Moon Phases (12)
Oreo Moon Phases

 

2 thoughts on “Moon Craters”

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