Mixing with Science

Good Morning scientists! We just did a fun experiment to see how you can use science to mix things up. You should try it with your little scientists today.

MaterialsMixing with Science (3)

Pan (To catch any dyed water that may escape)

Food Dye (2 Colors, we used blue and pink)

4 Plastic bottles with large openings (We used Gatorade)

1 Playing Card

Investigation

  1. Add 2-4 drops of food coloring to two of the bottles, we choose to do blue to represent cold. Fill the bottles with cold tap water. Place one of the bottles in your pan. set aside the other.
  2. Add 2-4 drops of food coloring to two of the bottles, we choose to do pink to represent hot. Fill the bottles with hot tap water. Place one of the bottles in your pan next to the cold one. Place a playing card on top of the other hot bottle (pink).Mixing with Science (17).JPG
  3. Flip the hot water bottle over and place it with the playing card on top of the blue (cold water) bottle.Mixing with Science (18)
  4. Carefully pull the playing card out from between the two bottles making sure the bottle line up.Mixing with Science (19).JPG
  5. Repeat the process by placing the playing card on top of the cold blue bottle. Flip the bottle with card over onto the red (hot) bottle. Gently remove the playing card, making sure the bottles are lined up.
  6. Observe what happens to the water in the bottles with your little scientist. Let the bottles sit and check on them periodically.

Talking Points

You may be wondering why did the water mix up right away when you have the blue (Cold water) on top and the pink (Hot water) on the bottom. The answer is that hot air and water rise and cold air and water sink back down to the bottom. This process occurs until both temperatures are equal. This is also a great way to visualize heat transfer. The colors will mix in both of the sets of bottles but the speed will vary greatly between the two sets.

Heat transfer is when heat or thermal energy is moved from one thing to another with a different temperature. There are three types of heat transfer convection, conduction, and radiation. Our experiment transferred heat using convection. Convection is when heat is transferred by circling motion of hot air or liquid (less dense) rising and cooler air or liquid (more dense) sinking or being pulled back down by gravity.

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