Earthquake in a Jar

Good afternoon scientists! We have been busy SHAKING things up with the Earthquake in a Jar Investigation. Get SHAKING with your little scientists too! šŸ™‚

 

Materials

Earthquake in a Jar (4)

Large Rocks

Small Rocks

Sand

Dirt/Soil

Empty Peanut Butter Jar

Small Scoop (We used 1/3 cup scoop)

Water (We used a bottle of water to make it easier)

Funnel (Optional)

Investigation

  1. Scoop 3-5 (Keep the number of scoops the same for each ingredient) scoops of large rocks into the clean, empty peanut butter jar.Earthquake in a Jar (8)
  2. Scoop 3-5 (Keep the number of scoops the same for each ingredient) scoops of small rocks into jar.Earthquake in a Jar (17)
  3. Scoop 3-5 (Keep the number of scoops the same for each ingredient) scoops of sand rocks into the jar.Earthquake in a Jar (24)
  4. Scoop 3-5 (Keep the number of scoops the same for each ingredient) scoops of soil rocks into the jar.Earthquake in a Jar (35)
  5. Fill the jar to the top with water and seal tightly. Take the jar outside and shake it up! Open the jar and again fill to the top with water, repeat shaking and adding water until the jar stays filled. Shake thoroughly and set out of reach of children and pets for 24 hours. 

  6. Check on your Earthquake in a jar and see the results.Earthquake in a Jar (58)

Talking Points

This investigation is a shaking good time. We simulated different layers of Earth with the large rocks, small rocks, sand, and soil. We also use the water to represent the groundwater in the Aquifer.

Ground water is the water in the soil under the ground. Under the Earth we have an Aquifer which is an underground storage area of ground water that is surrounded by permeable rock, rock with holes and crevices to store the water. In our experiment when we added the sand to the larger rock it started to fill in the gaps, this is an example of the smaller sand permeating or filling in the larger gaps in the stone. Here in Florida our aquifer is underneath the land and is surrounded by limestone rock. We pull our drinking water from the aquifer.

An Earthquake is when the ground shakes violently and suddenly. Earthquakes can happen anywhere on planet Earth but are more common along fault lines or areas where the different tectonic plates (floating sheets of Earth) meet. We started with nice even lines of rocks, but after our Earthquake the layers mixed up together just like the Earth in our yards.

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